NZ Level 3
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Compare numbers (to 10000)
Lesson

Comparing large numbers

We can compare numbers such as $23$23 and $5432$5432 just by looking at them, but comparing numbers such as $2314$2314$2134$2134 and $2341$2341 is not quite as easy.   

This is where we can follow a method that works no matter how large our numbers are. We'll be looking at numbers in the thousands in this video, but you could use this method for even larger numbers. By starting at the digit to the far left of the number, we are starting with the highest value digit. For the numbers we'll be using, the digit represents thousands.  Thousands are worth more than hundreds, and hundreds are worth more than ones (units). We work from left to right and can compare numbers by looking at each place value in turn.

To look more into the value of a number, this chapter may help remind you of the different columns in our place value table.

The video also shows you how to work out if a statement such as  $2456>2546$2456>2546 is true or false.   First, we identify that$>$>means 'greater than', and then work out if $2456$2456 is, in fact, greater than$2546$2546.  If it is, we can say the statement is true.  This chapter on comparing numbers may also be useful, to help you investigate the symbols for greater than, and less than.

 

Worked Examples

Question 1

Look at the two numbers below:

$8864,8684$8864,8684

  1. Which number is the largest?

    $8864$8864

    A

    $8684$8684

    B

    $8864$8864

    A

    $8684$8684

    B

Question 2

Look at the list below:

$9321,9721,9821$9321,9721,9821

  1. Which number is the largest from the list?

    $9721$9721

    A

    $9821$9821

    B

    $9321$9321

    C

    $9721$9721

    A

    $9821$9821

    B

    $9321$9321

    C

Question 3

Is the following number statement true or false?

$896$896 > $869$869

  1. True

    A

    False

    B

    True

    A

    False

    B

Outcomes

NA3-3

Know counting sequences for whole numbers.

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