UK Secondary (7-11)
topic badge
Multiplication x5
Lesson

You may already know how to count up by fives. Let's practice now! $5,10,15,20,25,30,35,40,45,50$5,10,15,20,25,30,35,40,45,50. What you may not have realised is that when you're counting up with this pattern, you are actually looking at multiples of five and saying the answers to your five times tables! Just look:

$1$1 group of $5$5 $1\times5$1×5 $5$5
$2$2 groups of $5$5 $2\times5$2×5 $10$10
$3$3 groups of $5$5 $3\times5$3×5 $15$15
$4$4 groups of $5$5 $4\times5$4×5 $20$20
$5$5 groups of $5$5 $5\times5$5×5 $25$25
$6$6 groups of $5$5 $6\times5$6×5 $30$30
$7$7 groups of $5$5 $7\times5$7×5 $35$35
$8$8 groups of $5$5 $8\times5$8×5 $40$40
$9$9 groups of $5$5 $9\times5$9×5 $45$45
$10$10 groups of $5$5 $10\times5$10×5 $50$50
$11$11 groups of $5$5 $11\times5$11×5 $55$55
$12$12 groups of $5$5 $12\times5$12×5 $60$60

 

Remember!

When we multiply a whole number by $5$5,

the answer will always end in a $0$0 or a $5$5.

 

Similar to how we can use a doubling strategy for our $2,4$2,4 and $8$8 times tables, we can use a halving strategy for our $5$5 times tables (because half of $10$10 groups is $5$5 groups). Watch this video to see how.

Worked Examples

Question 1

$5\times6$5×6

 

Question 2

$12\times5$12×5

What is Mathspace

About Mathspace